Supporting holistic conception in pharmacy

Australia has witnessed a decline in fertility rates over the past four decades1,2, with age and lifestyle factors playing a major role in this trend.

Although 80 per cent of infertility cases may be attributed to medical or pathological causes, in an astounding 20 per cent of cases, the reasons for infertility are unknown3.

Age is a significant variable in infertility for both men and women. Women are born with a finite number of eggs, which decline both in quality and quantity over time4.

According to Sydney-based fertility specialist and gynaecologist, and creator of Australia’s first holistic pregnancy kit, conceivepleaseTM, Dr Raewyn Teirney, “It is vital to look at an individual’s health as a whole, by considering their behaviours, level of activity, exercise and diet.

“There is a plethora of research showing factors such as nutrition, body-mass index, smoking and alcohol can compromise one’s chance of natural conception.”

The number of IVF cycles grew almost fourfold, from 17,874 in 1992 to 70,082 in 2012, across Australia and New Zealand5.

“More couples are tending to put parenting on hold, especially women, for career and social reasons, and are increasingly turning to IVF to try to conceive,” Dr Teirney said.

“Despite vast improvements in IVF technologies and the tremendous increase in the number of IVF cycles, I would confidently say that 50 per cent of the couples whom I have consulted do not require IVF. Instead, modifying certain lifestyle factors, and examining both the man and woman from a holistic standpoint, can significantly improve a couple’s chance of fertility.”

Research also indicates that having a better understanding of the female fertility cycle and the importance of timed sexual intercourse increases the chance of conception6,7.

The conceiveplease fertility kit, which adopts a holistic approach to natural fertility, educates users about the importance of modifying lifestyle factors, offers preconception health and support, and various tools to track the fertility cycle and detect early pregnancy.

“I designed the kit to give couples a holistic approach to conception,” Dr Teirney said. “The kit offers pharmacists the option of recommending to their customers a clinically rigorous tool that accounts for four important facets of natural conception.”

Conceiveplease is now available in leading pharmacies nationwide, and is available for wholesale purchase from Integria and Osborne distributors and the Minfos and RangeMe online databases. Components of the fertility kit, including the Ovulation and Pregnancy Planning Kits and the One Step HCG Urine pregnancy tests, may be sold separately. The conceiveplease Preconception and Pregnancy Vitamins and the SpermPlus for Men Only Vitamins are also available for separate sale, and can be bought with the kit from  www.conceiveplease.com

 

References

  1. Wilcox AJ, Weinberg CR, Baird DD (1995) Timing of sexual intercourse in relation to ovulation. New England Journal of Medicine 333: 1517-1521.
  2. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2011) Fertility rates. Available at: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Products/3301.0~2011~Main+Features~Fertility+rates [last accessed September 2017].
  3. IVF Australia. Male Fertility. Available at: http://ivf.com.au/about-fertility/male-reproductive-system [last accessed August 2016].
  4. Your Fertility. For Women. Available at: http://yourfertility.org.au/for-women/age [last accessed September 2017].
  5. UNSW National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit (NPESU). Available at: https://npesu.unsw.edu.au/data-collection/australian-new-zealand-assisted-reproduction-database-anzard [last accessed September 2017].
  6. Wilcox AJ, Weinberg CR, Baird DD (1995) Timing of sexual intercourse in relation to ovulation. New England Journal of Medicine 333: 1517-1521.
  7. WHO (1980) Taskforce on Methods for Determination of the Fertile Period. Temporal relationships between ovulation and defined changes in the concentration of plasma estradol-17, luteinising hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and progesterone. Probit analysis. AM J Obstet Gynaecol; 138: 383-390.
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